Inside the Studio: Part I
by Andrea García Cuevas
November 23, 2015
Sebastián Beltrán
Sebastián's studio in León, Guanajuato.
“Freedom guides the creative process of my projects. Thinking in different ways and be open for innovation and to push the boundaries of the formal, symbolic and pragmatic possibilities of the projects."
Ana Gómez
“My creative process varies according to the project, but I have two key approaches: to explore a creative streak from different angles and to use improvisation to confront matter and space."
Arta Cerámica, Ana's studio in Mexico City.
Íker Ortiz
Íker's studio in Mexico City.
"Throughout the production I sketch and work a lot in paper, playing with the limitations of each material. Once I have the final designs, manufacturing quality must be excellent to achieve flawless and timeless pieces.”
Victor Pérez-Rul
“My creative process is very experimental, I do a lot of scientific and technological research as well as technical development."
Victor's studio in Mexico City.
Karla Sotres
Karla's studio in Fara in Sabina, Italy.
"My favourite moment while producing a piece is drawing on the wheel, feeling the moisture, modeling its lines and curves."
Ania Wolowska from NATIVO
“Our creative process originates from observation and reflection on the wood, a wonderful raw material with which we seek to make pieces that retain their natural essence in the purest form."
Bacalar, Quintana Roo.
Poleta Rodete
Poleta's studio in Mexico City.
"During my creative process experimenting with shapes and materials is essential. I enjoy the idea of playing with accidents and chances to transform matter."
Abel Zavala
"Using the principles of minimalism, I choose and manipulate the materials so they become the star of the aesthetic experience, with special emphasis on the formal quality and the production processes."
Abel's studio in Xalapa, Veracruz.
Behind every art and design piece there is a creative process. Six of our creators talk about their individual working methods and share images of their studios and workshops:
 
-Sebastián Beltrán

 

“Freedom guides the creative process of my projects. Thinking in different ways and be open for innovation and to push the boundaries of the formal, symbolic and pragmatic possibilities of the projects. As the process continues, each project - due to its many variables - determines whether the intention of breaking those boundaries is feasible or not. Thus, freedom is interwoven with the responsibility and the convergent thinking to arrive at the realization of the pieces.”

 

-Ana Gómez

 

“My creative process varies according to the project, but I have two key approaches: to explore a creative streak from different angles and to use improvisation to confront matter and space. The first is guided by research I am interested in, that is how new ideas emerge. I have very clear vision of what I want to say so I focus on communicating it in the best way possible.  The second one is much more organic, I never know where I will go.”

 

-Íker Ortiz

 

“I usually start with a specific theme for my collections, mostly inspired by architecture, art and design. Throughout the production I sketch and work a lot in paper, playing with the limitations of each material. Once I have the final designs, manufacturing quality must be excellent to achieve flawless and timeless pieces.”

 

-Víctor Pérez-Rul

 

“My creative process is very experimental, I do a lot of scientific and technological research as well as technical development. The core of this process is the use of energy as a scientific, physical and philosophical cause.”

 

-Karla Sotres

 

“My creative process starts and feeds on my context. My numen is each  territory and my journey to it. People, their habits and traditions, their land and roads, their history and heritage, their creative manifestations, guide me in the journey. Technology and materials are my allies. I see the realization of my pieces like memories of who I was and who I am now. My favourite moment while producing a piece is drawing on the wheel, feeling the moisture, modeling its lines and curves. My process is slow and content. It is also recurrent, open, permeable, flexible and continuous. I like to give space to improvisation and intuition, that gives vitality and freedom to the work. I'm a designer, a craftsman, a ceramist and artist.”

 

-Nativo

 

“Our creative process originates from observation and reflection on the wood, a wonderful raw material with which we seek to make pieces that retain their natural essence in the purest form. Nativo designs in response to the shape of the wood with the hollow curves influencing the production. The result: each piece has its own character and is unique. Nativo understands the language of the wood, it has its own characteristics and details which we strive to accentuate. Its shape, color, size, age, history and the touch of the craftsman's hand, never duplicated. We know the history of each tree with which we work and we are proud to give it a second life.”

 

-Poleta Rodete

 

"To realize an idea I go through different layers or levels of reflection. First, there must be an element that encourages the intention of my research: from a social, natural or cultural phenomenon, to a concept that needs to be further explored. During my creative process experimenting with shapes and materials is essential. I enjoy the idea of playing with accidents and chances to transform matter."

 

-Abel Zavala

 

"The concepts and forms in my work originate from the observation of my surroundings and the revision of art itself. Although my background is painting, I have chosen a three-dimensional type of production. Using the principles of minimalism, I choose and manipulate the materials so they become the star of the aesthetic experience, with special emphasis on the formal quality and the production processes. I am interested in the intersection between contemporary languages with traditional techniques, such as textiles and ceramics, being the last one my favorite technique because it allows me to have two lines: my personal artistic work and the production of utilitarian objects."